Reviewing Indie Authors One Book at a Time

Please welcome another Spotlight Author from Rave Reviews Book Club – April Adams

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The Hook

Ah, the elusive “hook.”

What is it, exactly? When should it happen in relation to the rest of the story?

Those are very important questions and can mean the difference between a successful and unsuccessful book.

The “hook” is that point where your reader is engaged. Usually it’s the initial plot point, but sometimes it can be the very first sentence if done well enough. Sometimes it’s the writer’s style that hooks more than any plot or character device. It’s a tool we can use to make sure the reader can’t put our book down. And, there is more than one hook to be utilized.

  1. The Initial Hook – This should happen within the first ten pages of your book. That’s within the first one or two chapters, give or take. If you wait longer than this the reader is likely to get bored, and that’s something you definitely don’t want. Start your story as close to that first plot/character pivot point as you can so that the hook happens as soon as possible. If it’s a murder mystery, lead with the murder not the backstory of the characters. If it’s a literary novel make sure the character faces some dire or life-changing event right off the bat. If it’s a thriller, start it off going zero to sixty in nothing flat. Know your genre, know your hook.
  2. The End of the Chapter Hook – This is just as important, if not more so. Have you ever been reading a book and thought, “I’ll just read to the end of this chapter, then I’ll go to sleep,” only to have that chapter end in a way that you couldn’t possibly stop there? That’s the end of chapter hook. Make sure you include this at the end of most, if not all, chapters. End with something unfinished, conflicts still heated, mysteries getting more and more mysterious. Just because someone is hooked initially doesn’t mean they’ll keep reading if you don’t keep them wanting more.
  3. The Pacing Hook – Pacing is tough to master but for those of us serious about writing, it’s as important as the alphabet. You have to balance intensity with backstory and exposition. It’s best to wave it together in a way that seems effortless but is, in fact, heavily orchestrated. That’s where outlines come into so much importance. If you don’t outline even the main points, you’re missing out on some vital elements of crafting a great story.

 

So, there you have it! The three hooks and how they work. You’ll be amazed at how implementing these simple strategies will improve the excitement and reception of your work. Grab the reader’s attention and hold it, and you’ll have a reader for life.

 

ShatteredFinalCoverFront

 

Find APRIL ADAMS online!

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/April-Adams/e/B00CHRCD8G

Twitter: @apriladamsnovel
Facebook:   www.fb.com/apriladamsnovel
Website: www.writerapriladams.com
Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/apriladamsnovel

 

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Comments on: "Spotlight Author – April Adams" (12)

  1. I’d say that you’ve got a 4th hook, April – your cover for Shattered is amazingly enticing and intriguing! The Legends of Rune are definitely going on my TBR shelf 😀

    Thanks for having us over Bee 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. harmonykentonline said:

    I’m with Jan … I love the cover! Congrats again on being in the Spotlight! Have a great week 🙂

    Thanks so much for letting us all hang out today, Bee 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great information, April! Thanks for sharing:) I have just crossed over into adult fiction recently, so these kinds of things are exactly what I need to know.

    Thanks for hosting, Bee! Lovely blog:)

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Another informative post, April. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

    Thanks for hosting, Bee.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks so much for hosting, Bee! Jan, I look forward to seeing how you like it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hooks are fun to write, too. You want the reader to say, “What? I can’t believe that!” or “OMG, what just happened?” I completely agree about the hooks, especially at the end of a chapter. I’ve stayed up late reading many books because I had to find out what happened next. I think the pacing is what so many writers have a lot of trouble with. They think they have to tell you everything about the characters when you first meet them. I’ve read a lot of books lately that should have started 5 or 6 chapters in where the story really begins, then give us the background in smaller bits, that are easier to digest. This is a big mistake of new writers, myself included.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Thanks for stopping by!

    Like

  8. Thank you April for refreshing my mind on the rules of writing. The hook… if one gets it right, one has a great story. Thank you Bee for hosting.

    Like

  9. Thanks for hosting, April, Bee. Thanks, April, for sharing your tips.

    Like

  10. So true! I love my hooks, and would put them in just for me (’cause I love being ‘hooked’). Thanks for sharing that – gave me a warm glow! Here’s mine from the end of ch1 of ‘A Wizard of Dreams’ :

    “Zack always knew where Edith was. When she came back with her cup of tea, Teddy would be back on Gordon’s pillow. There was no sense in worrying her before she had to be.”

    (It works in situ…) 🙂

    Like

  11. Another wonderfully, informative post!! Thanks, Bee, for sharing your blog with us. Your support is always appreciated!!!

    Like

  12. Bee, thank you fore hosting April. I’m sorry it took so long for me to visit. 🙂

    April, another insightful post. Well done! 🙂

    Like

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