Reviewing Indie Authors One Book at a Time

Posts tagged ‘historical fiction’

Molly Lee – On Sale

From the author of the best-selling novel,
REDEMPTION: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer
comes MOLLY LEE.ML-AJ

MOLLY LEE by Andrew Joyce is an Historical Fiction Adventure. This book is just $0.99 until September 27th.

About the Book:

Molly is about to set off on the adventure of a lifetime . . . of two lifetimes.

It’s 1861 and the Civil War has just started. Molly is an eighteen-year-old girl living on her family’s farm in Virginia when two deserters from the Southern Cause enter her life. One of them—a twenty-four-year-old Huck Finn—ends up saving her virtue, if not her life.

Molly is so enamored with Huck, she wants to run away with him. But Huck has other plans and is gone the next morning before she awakens. Thus starts a sequence of events that leads Molly into adventure after adventure; most of them not so nice.

We follow the travails of Molly Lee, starting when she is eighteen and ending when she is fifty-six. Even then Life has one more surprise in store for her.

Excerpt:

I first saw him in the light of the setting sun. He sat straight and proud astride a chestnut mare, handsome in his grey lieutenant’s uniform. He rode into the yard following my pa who was driving the family wagon. In the back of the wagon lay the “Captain.”

Amazon Link  :  GoodReads Link

Find Andrew Joyce on his website.

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Andrew Joyce – Guest

Andrew Joyce

My name is Andrew Joyce and I write books for a living. I thought I might entertain you with a little story about the publishing business.

My first book was a 125,000-word historical novel. And in the publishing world, anything over 80,000 words for a first-time author is heresy. Or so I was told time and time again when I approached an agent for representation. After two years of research and writing and a year of trying to secure the services of an agent, I got angry. To be told that my efforts were meaningless was somewhat demoralizing to say the least. I mean . . . those rejections were coming from people who had never even read my book.

So you want an 80,000-word novel?” I said to no one in particular, unless you count my dog, because he was the only one around at the time. Consequently, I decided to show them City Slickers that I could write an 80,000-word novel!

I had just finished reading Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn for the third time, and I started thinking about what ever happened to those boys, Tom and Huck. They must have grown up, but then what? So I sat down at my computer and banged out REDEMPTION: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer in two months. I had them as adults in the Old West. (Find it on Amazon) Then I sent out query letters to literary agents. Cover lV

Less than a month later, the chairman of one of the biggest agencies in New York City emailed me telling me that he loved the story and suggested a few changes. They were good suggestions, and I incorporated about 80% of them into the book. We signed a contract and it was off to the races, or so I thought. But then the real fun began: the serious editing. Seven months later, I gave birth to Huck and Tom as adults. And just for the record, the final word count is 79,914.

My new book is entitled MOLLY LEE and it’s averaging 4.9 stars on Amazon. For the next few days it will be priced at 0.99 cents. It is also available in paperback. Please check it out. (Amazon)

Thank you,

Andrew Joyce

http://andrewjoyce76.com

~*~*~*~

Thank you for the post, Andrew!

 

The Mine – John A. Heldt

MineJHWrapped into a unexpected time-traveling adventure, The Mine is a wonderful love story and a testament to friendship. Joel Smith accidentally goes back to the 1940s when he’s in an abandoned mine at the crazy right time of a massive planetary alignment, the kind that happens just once in a lifetime. Triggering some sort of technological (or even just plain magical) wall, Joel walks out to find the world a very different place than when he went in during May 2000.

We’ve all seen time-travel movies, the warnings of what happens when you have the opportunity to alter the past. So what is a young man to do realizing he’s trapped in the past, decades before he – and years before his parents – are born? He gets a job, uses his knowledge of sports highlights to win some bets, and tries not to screw up the lives of too many people along the way, especially knowing that the U.S. will be drawn into World War II within a few months of his unfortunate arrival. He creates a cover story for his mixed-up life, and he forms amazing friendships with college students his own age.

Joel doesn’t intended to fall in love, but he does it with so much heart you hope he has a wonderful life with the woman of his dreams. The romance is breathtaking and honest, even though Joel has to fudge a little about everything else.

Honestly, I was skeptical of the plot at first – I was worried I’d end up with an “I’m my own grandpa”-type of story (so glad it’s not!). I also fretted over a couple of technical mistakes (the drinking age before WWII was 18, not 21). But these can be overlooked by the great writing throughout the rest of the book. This book is well worth suspending your belief in space-time continuity for the vivid storytelling. The author must be a fan of antique cars, considering the passionate details he uses to describe them.

I recommend this book if you love a good story about interpersonal relationships, not matter what genre you prefer. There’s a little science fiction, a little romance, and a lot of good literature.

Find The Mine on Amazon.com

Chronicles from Chateau Moines-Blog Tour

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Welcome to my tour stop for Chronicles from Chateau Moines by Evelyne Holingue, a middle grade historical fiction. From March 2-13, join the tour laden with reviews, interviews, guest posts and excerpts. Check out the tour page for the full schedule.

About the Book:

September 1970: Scott’s mother has recently died and his father gets the crazy idea to move his family from California to Normandy. Now Scott has to learn to live without his mom while adjusting to France. In his seventh grade class there is only Ibrahim who comes from another country. Scott doesn’t even want to play his guitar anymore. Why does his father think that life will be better so far from home?

Scott has no idea that his arrival is also a challenge to Sylvie. While her best friend is excited to have an American boy at school, Sylvie cannot say one word to Scott. She can’t even write good songs in her notebook anymore. Why is life so different since Scott moved to Château Moines?

Set against the backdrop of the Vietnam War protest era and told from the perspectives of twelve-year old Scott and Sylvie, this is a story about loss and friendship, music and peace, and also about secrets.

Although this is a work of fiction, the cultural, social, and historical background of the early 1970s in France and the United States inspired the writing. At the end of the book the reader will find a list of the songs, the names of singers, and bands mentioned through the novel as well as some elements about fashion, immigration in France, the Vietnam War, and other cultural, social, and historical facts relevant to the period of time.

Goodreads | Amazon | B&N

Excerpt:

Brigitte Has a Costumed Party for Mardi Gras (page 208-210)

 

He (Scott) smells of his usual mix of patchouli and shampoo, a smell that I’ve come to recognize without even thinking. He’s quiet, but it’s perfect with me. We just sit next to each other, watching our entire class dance. Someone has cranked the volume up. The disco balls flash, and since everyone is costumed, it’s hard to know who is who. Scott’s funny guesses make me laugh.

“Is that Brigitte dancing?” He points at a couple.

The girl wears a feather boa and high heels. “Definitely Brigitte,” I say. “But the boy? No clue. You know what? It’s cool that everyone came.”

“Everyone didn’t come.” Scott’s voice doesn’t hide his disappointment.

“I think we are all here,” I say, straining my eyes. “Wait, where is Ibrahim?”

“Told you.”

“Maybe he wasn’t allowed.” I catch Scott’s glare. “You know, being from another country. I mean religion and everything.”

“Has nothing to do with him being Muslim.” Scott taps his foot to the beat of the music. “Right now, he’s playing soccer.”

“He only plays at school.”
“You don’t believe me?”
“Look, there is one soccer field in town, and the Arabs don’t use it.”
“That figures,” Scott says.
“They kept fighting.” I realize how stupid and unfair the idea is, since nobody knows who started the fight. In the end the Arabs gave up the field. “So, where is he playing?”

“You don’t want to know.” He stands up and offers me his hand. “You dance?”

I’ve never danced with a boy in my entire life. In a flash, my heart morphs into a bird trapped inside a cage. Panicked, the bird flutters his wings to escape. Scott and I stand at least thirty centimeters away from each other.

“Can someone put on “Bridge Over Trouble Water,” please?” he calls.

As soon as the guitars, harmonicas, and voices of Simon and Garfunkel fill the basement, he wraps his arms around my waist, and I bring mine to his neck, as if I knew what to do. I watch my step so I won’t crush his sandaled feet. We aren’t really dancing, so it’s easy. I’m starting to get the hang of it when Brigitte waves her arms up in the air like an octopus.

“My parents! My parents are home!” She switches the disco balls off.

Scott is the fastest to reach for the record player. But he’s still holding onto my waist, and I trip on the long hem of my dress. He catches me just before I fall flat on the ground and drags me to my feet. When I’m up, our faces are so close to each other that I can almost taste the gum he has been chewing.

“It was my first slow dance with a girl,” he says, his breath sweet and light in my ear. At the same second, someone turns the lights on.

 

About the Author:

evelyne0115I was born and raised in Normandy, France, where I spent most of my childhood reading.
My first published piece of writing was a poem about a man spending Christmas behind bars. I was eleven years old and wasn’t paid for my work, but I was hooked.
I studied French Literature at the Université de Caen and at the Sorbonne in Paris and worked in a publishing house before moving to California, following my husband.
It was a challenging time in my life as I was leaving my own career, my family, my friends and my beloved Paris behind.  But how could I say no to the dreams of the man I love?
Readers enjoy escaping the familiar for the unknown.  Being a foreigner is discovering the unknown day after day, not only for the time of a book. However, since most things in life come with a silver lining, I credit this move for giving me the opportunity to write. Through my words, I share my affection for my native and adoptive countries that I love equally.

http://www.evelyneholingue.com 

Giveaway: 
Two (2) kindle copies of Chronicles from Chateau Moines (INT)
Ends March 18th

a Rafflecopter giveaway

This event was organized by CBB Book Promotions.

 

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